MALARIA

Malaria is caused by a parasite that is transmitted from person to person by the bite of an infected Anopheles mosquito. These mosquitoes are present in almost all countries in the tropics and the subtropics. Anopheles mosquitoes bite during the nighttime hours, from dusk to dawn. Therefore, anti-malarial drugs are only recommended for travelers who will have exposure during evening and nighttime hours in malaria risk areas.

Symptoms of malaria include fever, chills, headache, muscle ache, and malaise. Early stages of malaria may resemble the onset of the flu. Travelers who become ill with a fever during or after travel in a malaria risk area should receive prompt medical attention and should inform their physician of their recent travel history. Malaria symptoms can develop as early as six to eight days after being bitten by an infected mosquito or as late as several months after departure from a malarious area, after anti-malarial drugs are discontinued.

Prevention

The use of anti-malarial drugs and use of personal protection measures against mosquito bites can often prevent malaria. Anti-malarial drugs are recommended for travelers who will have exposure to mosquitoes during evening and nighttime hours in malaria risk areas.

You have been prescribed the following medication:

Lariam (Mefloquine): ____tablet a week. Start 1 week before departure, use weekly while traveling, and for 4 weeks after returning.

Malarone(Atovaquone/Proguanil): ____ tablet a day. Start 2 days before departure, use daily while traveling, and for 7 days after returning.

Chloroquine: ____tablet a week. Start 1 week before departure, use weekly while traveling and for 4 weeks after returning.

* Contact our office if you develop fever after returning from your trip.